2016 WISE Man of the Year Award Winner

Tom Jones

CEO at Nuvia Ltd.

What three words sum up your STEM journey so far?

Equity – Acknowledge – Dialogue

Who/what inspired you to champion gender balance in STEM?

Meeting and listening to former Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo ABE talk about revitalising the Japanese economy after the Fukashima nuclear disaster. One statement stuck with me – Unleashing the Power of ‘Womenonics’ and tapping into the countries underutilized women resource.

What’s the best career advice you’ve ever been given?

Ask for forgiveness not for permission

What advice would you give to other men about the importance of gender balance in STEM today?

Organizations, and society, must change the conversations to change the culture and get the multitude of benefits that focus on the gender gap can have on improving the profitability and performance of any organization. Leaders must be prepared to talk openly, and reduce the stigma, to help address future gender balance.

As of June 2019, only 7 women held a CEO post in the FTSE 100 and only 5 in the FTSE 250.

What advice would you give to other men about how they can champion gender balance in STEM?

Make the workplace more balanced; understand and counteract unconscious bias, highlight role models who demonstrate positive behaviours and proactively, educate and actively engage with primary school-age students and promote a more flexible and creative approach to job roles.

Given the unique challenges we face due to COVID-19, how can we keep gender balance and diversity on the agenda?

Equity is different from equality and the COVID-19 global pandemic has demonstrated this. We have some unique challenges and must treat people as individuals, look after health and wellbeing and continue to provide everyone with the same opportunities to grow.

What can organisations do to increase/inspire more women into STEM?

Organisations, and society need early engagement with schools and teachers from primary school age upwards. If we invest time in schools, this will begin to reduce the unconscious bias which will open more career choices. We must encourage STEM ambassadors to actively engage with students.

Organisations should also promote flexible working and should be prepared to take a risk and give people opportunities to leverage diversity of thought and drive change in their leadership teams. If we don’t think differently, our outcomes will be the same.

What do you envision for the STEM sector over the next 20 years?

With the increased use and implementation of Big Data and Digital Transformation within businesses and particularly across Science and Engineering, undoubtedly the future will be very different over the next 20 years.

Companies, and society, will need to embrace and fully utilise these digital changes to improve performance. Our future children will need to be integrated into the machine and learn to ultilise the digital eraWhat three words sum up your STEM journey so far?

Equity – Acknowledge – Dialogue

Who/what inspired you to champion gender balance in STEM?

Meeting and listening to former Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo ABE talk about revitalising the Japanese economy after the Fukashima nuclear disaster. One statement stuck with me – Unleashing the Power of ‘Womenonics’ and tapping into the countries underutilized women resource.

What’s the best career advice you’ve ever been given?

Ask for forgiveness not for permission

What advice would you give to other men about the importance of gender balance in STEM today?

Organizations, and society, must change the conversations to change the culture and get the multitude of benefits that focus on the gender gap can have on improving the profitability and performance of any organization. Leaders must be prepared to talk openly, and reduce the stigma, to help address future gender balance.

As of June 2019, only 7 women held a CEO post in the FTSE 100 and only 5 in the FTSE 250.

What advice would you give to other men about how they can champion gender balance in STEM?

Make the workplace more balanced; understand and counteract unconscious bias, highlight role models who demonstrate positive behaviours and proactively, educate and actively engage with primary school-age students and promote a more flexible and creative approach to job roles.

Given the unique challenges we face due to COVID-19, how can we keep gender balance and diversity on the agenda?

Equity is different from equality and the COVID-19 global pandemic has demonstrated this. We have some unique challenges and must treat people as individuals, look after health and wellbeing and continue to provide everyone with the same opportunities to grow.

What can organisations do to increase/inspire more women into STEM?

Organisations, and society need early engagement with schools and teachers from primary school age upwards. If we invest time in schools, this will begin to reduce the unconscious bias which will open more career choices. We must encourage STEM ambassadors to actively engage with students.

Organisations should also promote flexible working and should be prepared to take a risk and give people opportunities to leverage diversity of thought and drive change in their leadership teams. If we don’t think differently, our outcomes will be the same.

What do you envision for the STEM sector over the next 20 years?

With the increased use and implementation of Big Data and Digital Transformation within businesses and particularly across Science and Engineering, undoubtedly the future will be very different over the next 20 years.

Companies, and society, will need to embrace and fully utilise these digital changes to improve performance. Our future children will need to be integrated into the machine and learn to ultilise the digital era

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